Importance of FDP today…

                                     fdp

 

In our country higher education does not traditionally come to our careers as teachers and managers of learning with little, if any, formal professional training or experience other than in the content of our various disciplines and perhaps employment as graduate teaching assistants.

Our lack of professional training as educators was perhaps understandable as long as relatively little was known about how learning occurs, how college students develop, and what the effects of the college experience are on that development. Our lack of training was perhaps irrelevant as long as most of our students were similar to us culturally and as learners and relatively advantaged both socially and financially.

Now, however, the wide diversity of our students, with a forecast of greater diversity still to come, together with the nation’s pressing need for truly well-educated graduates and a growing dissatisfaction with the quality of our graduates’ knowledge, skills, and values, suggest it is time we systematically use the fruits of research to inform our professional practice.

Instruction in courses, the central educational activity we traditionally use to produce learning in colleges and universities, is largely comprised of a lecture system in which 70 to 90 percent or more of college professors use the lecture as their preferred instructional method. Academic advising, where it occurs at all, is largely focused on helping students make short-term decisions as they choose from menus of course titles.

Many higher education researchers and influential national reports issued over the last two decades have asserted that such educational practices cannot produce the complex kinds of student outcomes required today by employers and for effective citizenship. The shift from a tradition-based, primarily a theoretical educational process to a research- and theory-based process will require not only constant innovation to incorporate new findings about learning but also the high-quality faculty and staff professional development necessary to support this innovation throughout each teacher’s and manager’s career.

In our country higher education does not traditionally come to our careers as teachers and managers of learning with little, if any, formal professional training or experience other than in the content of our various disciplines and perhaps employment as graduate teaching assistants.

Our lack of professional training as educators was perhaps understandable as long as relatively little was known about how learning occurs, how college students develop, and what the effects of the college experience are on that development. Our lack of training was perhaps irrelevant as long as most of our students were similar to us culturally and as learners and relatively advantaged both socially and financially.

Now, however, the wide diversity of our students, with a forecast of greater diversity still to come, together with the nation’s pressing need for truly well-educated graduates and a growing dissatisfaction with the quality of our graduates’ knowledge, skills, and values, suggest it is time we systematically use the fruits of research to inform our professional practice.

Instruction in courses, the central educational activity we traditionally use to produce learning in colleges and universities, is largely comprised of a lecture system in which 70 to 90 percent or more of college professors use the lecture as their preferred instructional method. Academic advising, where it occurs at all, is largely focused on helping students make short-term decisions as they choose from menus of course titles.

Many higher education researchers and influential national reports issued over the last two decades have asserted that such educational practices cannot produce the complex kinds of student outcomes required today by employers and for effective citizenship. The shift from a tradition-based, primarily a theoretical educational process to a research- and theory-based process will require not only constant innovation to incorporate new findings about learning but also the high-quality faculty and staff professional development necessary to support this innovation throughout each teacher’s and manager’s career.

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The CSR Imperative – How does it impact us

                                     csr_banner

The new Companies Act, 2013, has made it mandatory for companies to be socially responsible by introducing the ‘corporate social responsibility’ (CSR) regime. Section 135 of the new Companies Act, read with the CSR Rules, mandates companies meeting certain criteria to set aside two per cent of their net profits for undertaking and promoting socially beneficial activities and projects in India. The Ministry of Corporate Affairs (MCA) recently issued the CSR Rules, 2014, to implement this legislative mandate, which comes into effect on April 1, 2014.

Every company with a net worth of at least Rs 500 crore, or a minimum turnover of Rs 1,000 crore, or a minimum net profit of Rs 5 crore, is obligated to constitute a CSR committee dedicated to undertake a mixed spectrum of initiatives, such as promoting education, gender equality, women’s empowerment, improving maternal health, or ensuring environmental sustainability. The company’s net profit would, however, exclude any profit from its overseas branches or companies, and would also exclude any dividend received from other companies in India. The law does not treat foreign companies differently, and includes foreign companies doing business in India, whether by themselves, or through an agent or even electronically. The company can choose the social cause or project it wants to support from the list of activities specified in the Act. The CSR committee will then have to frame a CSR policy in accordance with the rules and implement it. The company’s board of directors will have to play an active role by participating in the CSR initiative at various stages, including the identification of the activities, approving the policy, and disclosing its contents in the board’s report and on the company website. Surplus funds in respect of the CSR projects cannot form a part of the company profits. The rules specifically exclude contributions or donations made to political parties from CSR activity.

There are approximately 11 lakh registered companies in India today and only 14,500 companies out of the 11 lakh come under the ambit of the new CSR rules, which mandate a spend of two per cent of the total revenues of the companies towards CSR.The new legislation will imply that the list of the CSR activities undertaken by the companies are put up in the public domain and that the corporates reveal the sum spent on the CSR activities. The new CSR legislation has been formulated to bring together the triad of government, corporates and implementing agencies. The Companies Act is a tool that has to be viewed as a fine piece of legislation and, as such therefore, an opportunity to create new vistas in the sector.The attitude towards the CSR needs to change across the country. Section 135 of the Companies Act, which talks about CSR pushes us to do things which we forget to do and lend a helping hand to those in need and make a difference.

Global Exposure for MBA students

                                     mba_03_student_life

The outside world is changing and as educators of future leaders, one needs to think about how these changes can equip students and young professionals. Business schools should prepare students to be business managers who are ethical and competent. They must be able to operate in a wide range of situations. In order to operate in a global economy, students need to gain an international perspective through exposure to global faculty and internationally diverse classmates, as well as a first-hand experience of dynamism in different markets.

Wall Street and Silicon Valley are not the only world anymore. The world (market) is going to be where the middle class will explode – Africa, India, Latin America and Asia. Increasingly, a number of B-schools are taking their students to different countries to understand the bridge between the conservative “old world” European and North American markets, and the new “emerging” markets.

International experiences increase students’ global perspective and ensure that they are equipped to do business anywhere in the world. Traditional study tours, student exchanges, field trips and international internships are already an established model in business education. B-schools are now identifying the importance of experiential immersive learning in the global arena. Such programmes place great emphasis on the “experience” and provide an opportunity for students to build on their academic frameworks and to test their knowledge in the real world of emerging and dynamic markets.

With social media bringing people closer together, networking in all its guises, accounts for over 80% of managerial and professional job sourcing internationally. It is a core skill that is essential to build and explore a career. While social media is becoming significant for generating contacts, it, by no means, replaces the need to make personal connections and one-on-one relationships. Many sectors still heavily rely on personal connections and reputation, and it is important to be able to engage effectively with relevant communities in different international markets.

Oakbrook Business School Induction Program:Unique Induction of #MBA #AhmedabadMBA

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Oakbrook Business School has organised a unique week long Induction Program where students will get an ambitious start for their MBA. The program has a large number of profound speakers from esteemed organisations. The program starts from 1st August 2014. Havent enrolled for #MBA @OBS yet? hurry!!!

The induction program aims at

  • Orient the students about the industry’s expectations from managers
  • Provide all-round information about the various dimensions of a corporate career
  • Provide a platform to ask questions and clear doubts about industries

The induction program at OBS is designed in a manner that all the facets of a corporate career are shared with the students. It gives a practical footing to the theories that are to follow. The interactions with the students and the visits to the nearby industrial area will help the students gain exposure to the way the professional managers work.  At the end of the week, we aim at providing the air beneath the wings of many dreams.

 

CSR: A broader prospective for Corporates of India

The world is moving at a rapid pace, there has been phenomenal growth in the corporate sector of India with a large number of international corporations setting up here. Alongwith this growth there also arises the need of giving back something to the society. Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) is becoming an integral part of corporate world today as they are becoming a philanthropic gateway for the organization. CSR can be defined as “the responsibility of enterprises for their impacts on society”.

The businesses have a great impact on society nowadays and thereby have ample societal expectations entwined with them. The roots of Corporate Social Responsibility lie in philanthropic activities of corporations. In India, the practice of CSR still remains with charitable space but has moved to Institutional building and Community Development through various projects through global influences, and with communities becoming more active and demanding, there appears to be a discernible trend. CSR is becoming more strategic in nature and a large number of companies are displaying their activities on websites, annual reports, sustainable reports and even publishing CSR reports. The businesses are now thoroughly aware and conscious of their social, environmental and economic responsibilities, and balance these different considerations in an ethical manner. This awareness has also brought an increasing concern amongst all stakeholders, who are demanding that businesses of all types and sizes need to function with fairness and responsibility.

There is a good reason for businesses to do well with profit as well as with service; it is so that businesses can take the lead in empowering change in the world. There is a critical paradigm shift today where business has to take the lead in engaging governments, communities and other critical civil society organisations to be able to facilitate dialogue and develop solutions to solve the bigger issues that challenge humanity. This should be the purpose of responsible capitalism.?????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????

What to do after graduation?

                                 graduation

It is no exaggeration to say that underemployment is a blight on our society – its consequence is an inefficient workforce. For any young person, jobs are scarce and competition is fierce. You need to understand that collecting qualifications will not change this!

A degree will not excuse stuttering through an interview, it will not correct spelling mistakes on a CV and other instantaneous mistakes that you commit. A degree is rather a proof that you wanted to learn, can learn and will keep learning.

Learning is a process that accelerates your mind and sharpens it up to deal with the challenges of your career. Learning should be such that, it shows that your mind has been stretched and twisted, contradicted and challenged, molded and remolded. But you also need to multiply the knowledge you acquired and apply it in the practical world. And for this, you need to preserve your thirst for learning, it should not end after you have earned your degree.

Though, having a degree isn’t enough. Kind-minded but wrong advice says ‘any degree will do’ but choice of subject is an extremely crucial matter. It’s not uncommon to hear people laugh at at subjects like classics and philosophy, questioning their value in the so-called ‘real world.’ These subjects and their kind are taken for learning, intellect, knowledge and understanding. Only those incapable of doing so would resent those who are motivated this way. We seem to have a real problem with people judging a degree for its monetary value and earning power alone.

One should be passionate to learn something new everyday, and he/she should go to college to fulfill this thirst, not just for mere attendance in the class. A college degree will only be fruitful if it is in the area of your interest, and genuine quest for knowledge about that subject. While a classics degree may not have a direct career attached to it in the way medicine does, those who want to learn should be encouraged, not disparaged. After all, as Oscar Wilde said, ‘You can never be overdressed or over-educated.’